Fake Elder Scrolls Online developers go phishing on PlayStation - We take a look at a pressure-filled phishing attempt sent to players of the Elder Scrolls Online video game.
Report: Organizations remain vulnerable to increasing insider threats - The risk and challenges insider threats pose to organizations are ever present, even before tech as we know it existed. The age of digitization only made it higher and far-reaching. How has insider threats evolved over time? Where are we now in terms of mitigating insider threat risk? Are businesses really doing something about it? We answer such questions—and more—in this post.
Explained: What is containerization? - Containerization is gaining traction as a method to improve consistency, portability, and scalability without the investments required for virtualization. But is it secure?
There’s an app for that: web skimmers found on PaaS Heroku - Cybercriminals are abusing platform-as-a-service (PaaS) cloud provider Heroku to build web skimming apps and steal customer data.
New version of IcedID Trojan uses steganographic payloads - We take a deep dive into the IcedID Trojan, describing the new payloads of this advanced malware.
A week in security (November 25 – December 1) - A roundup of cybersecurity news from November 25 – December 1, including the concept of
Would ‘Medicare for All’ help secure health data? - Beyond the usual arguments on this subject, we wanted to ask the question: Are there any security risks we need to be worried about if the United States were to switch to ‘Healthcare for All’ policies?
Sextortion scammers getting creative - We’ve covered sextortion before, focusing in on how the core of the threat is an exercise in trust. The threat actor behind the campaign will use whatever information available on the target that causes them to trust that the threat actor does indeed have incriminating information on them. (They don’t.) But as public awareness of...
‘Data as property’ promises fix for privacy problems, but could deepen inequality - Data property supporters in the US argue that, through data payments, Americans could rebalance the relationship they have with the technology industry, giving them more control over their data privacy and putting some extra money in their pockets. But the cost to privacy, some say, is too high.

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