A week in security (August 5 – 11)

The latest cybersecurity news for the week of August 5–11. We touch on problematic backdoors, the grim possibility of the Internet of Thoughts, and smart home improvement. We also released a retrospective report on ransomware.

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A week in security (July 22 – 28)

The latest cybersecurity news for the week of July 22–28. We look at Phobos ransomware, stalkerware’s similarities to parental monitoring apps, and the investigation into Malaysian Airlines Flight 17.

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Changing California’s privacy law: A snapshot at the support and opposition

Before the California Senate returns from its summer recess, we look at the authors, supporters, opponents, and donors involved in an extended fight to change California’s privacy law, the California Consumer Privacy Act.

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A week in security (July 15 – 21)

A roundup of cybersecurity news from July 15–21, including the Zoom camera vulnerability, Extenbro, Sodinokibi, Magecart, and cybersecurity challenges facing the education sector.

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New Facebook ad reporting tool launches in UK

Consumer expert Martin Lewis took Facebook to court over multiple rogue ads bearing his likeness. It’s now been settled out of court, and Facebook users have a new tool in the fight against bad ads.

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Cooperating apps and automatic permissions are setting you up for failure

Apps that cooperate and share permissions might seem convenient, but are they worth the security and privacy risk?

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Adware and PUPs families add push notifications as an attack vector

Push notifications are being added to the arsenal of PUPs, adware, and even a Trojan browser extension that spams Facebook groups.

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Apple iOS 13 will better protect user privacy, but more could be done

Apple’s newest iOS features provide simple, easy-to-use options that can leave users more informed and more in control of their online privacy. But privacy experts agreed: Apple can—and should—go further.

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Maine inches closer to shutting down ISP pay-for-privacy schemes

Unlike a data privacy proposal in the US and a new data privacy law in California, the Maine data privacy bill aimed at Internet Service Providers (ISPs) explicitly shuts down any pay-for-privacy schemes.

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NIST’s privacy framework lets privacy tell its own story

As the Senate sits on no fewer than four data privacy bills that their own members wrote—with no plans to vote on any—and as the world’s largest social media company braces for an anticipated multibillion-dollar privacy blunder, the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has published what it calls a “privacy framework” draft.

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