WhatsApp reverses course, will not limit app functionality

WhatsApp said it will no longer limit app functionality for users who refuse to share some data with Facebook.

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A week in security (May 10 – 16)

A roundup of the previous week’s most interesting secrurity stories alongside the very best of our own research, from May 10 – 16.

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WhatsApp calls and messages will break unless you share data with Facebook

WhatsApp will remove core functions for users who refuse to share some of their data with Facebook, rendering the app useless for some.

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A week in security (January 18 – January 24)

An action-packed week on Malwarebytes Labs with ZeroLogon, DNSPooq, WhatsApp privacy, Tiktok settings, Zoom watermarking, and more.

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What’s up with WhatsApp’s privacy policy?

WhatsApp has been in the news after a change to its privacy policy. We look at what this means for you as a WhatsApp user.

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A week in security (December 14 – December 20)

A roundup of cybersecurity news from December 14 – 20, including SolarWinds, smart toys, Egregor, and many other topics.

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A week in security (June 8 – 14)

A roundup of news and blog posts from the week of June 8 – 14, including the Honda ransomware attack, search hijackers, and what to look for in an RMM platform.

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International Women’s Day: awareness of stalkerware, monitoring, and spyware apps on the rise

For International Women’s Day, Malwarebytes is measuring the impact of our own campaign to raise awareness and protect users. These are the numbers on stalkerware, monitoring, and spyware apps.

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Stalkerware’s legal enforcement problem

Those who install stalkerware with the intent to monitor, control, harass, or otherwise abuse their victims typically get away with it, avoiding legal penalty even if there’s plenty of evidence to suggest their guilt.

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ACCESS Act might improve data privacy through interoperability

Data privacy is back in Congressional lawmakers’ sights, as proposed legislation called the ACCESS Act focuses not on data collection, storage, and selling, but on the idea that Americans should be able to easily pack up their data and take it to a competing service. But will this actually protect privacy?

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